PRK

PRK Overview

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is a type of laser eye surgery used to correct refractive errors. It was the first laser vision correction procedure and is still widely used today. PRK reshapes the cornea to help light focus more accurately on the retina, improving vision

Introduction

PRK uses an excimer laser to reshape the cornea by removing a thin layer of tissue. The surgeon first removes the epithelium (the top layer of the cornea) to access the corneal tissue underneath. The laser is then used to reshape the cornea according to the patient’s specific refractive error. Once the procedure is complete, the epithelium heals naturally over a few days.

How PRK Works

PRK uses an excimer laser to reshape the cornea by removing a thin layer of tissue. The surgeon first removes the epithelium (the top layer of the cornea) to access the corneal tissue underneath. The laser then reshapes the cornea according to the patient’s specific refractive error. Once the procedure is complete, the epithelium heals naturally over a few days.

Who Is the Right Candidate for PRK?

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Ideal candidates for PRK are usually over the age of 18 and have stable vision prescriptions for at least a year.
  • Candidates should not have other significant eye conditions, such as cataracts or glaucoma.

Disqualifying Factors

  • Individuals with thin corneas, severe dry eye, or corneal diseases may not be suitable candidates.
  • Pregnant or nursing women should postpone the procedure

Additional Criteria

  • Patients with active lifestyles or careers that may be affected by corneal flap complications (such as athletes and military personnel) may benefit from PRK.

Preoperative Assessment

Before undergoing PRK, a thorough eye examination is necessary to determine if you are a suitable candidate for the procedure:

Comprehensive Eye Examination

  • Review your medical history and assess your overall eye health.

Visual Acuity:

  • Measure your ability to see clearly at different distances.

Corneal Thickness:

  • Determine the thickness of your cornea using a device called a pachymeter.

Topography and Wavefront Analysis:

  • Map the curvature and surface of your cornea and assess the quality of your vision.

Pupil Size:

  • Measure the size of your pupil in different lighting conditions.

Intraocular Pressure (IOP) Measurement:

  • Check your eye pressure for glaucoma risk assessment.

To ensure you are well-prepared for PRK:

Avoid Contact Lenses:

  • Avoid wearing contact lenses for a few days before surgery as recommended by your doctor.

No Makeup or Lotions:

  • Refrain from wearing makeup, lotions, or perfumes on the day of surgery to prevent eye irritation.

Arrange Transportation:

  • You will need someone to drive you home after surgery.

Eat a Light Meal:

  • Have a light meal before surgery to avoid discomfort.

Advances in PRK

Over the years, PRK has seen significant advances thanks to improvements in laser technology and other surgical techniques. These advances have made PRK a safer and more precise procedure:

Pupil Tracking:

  • Modern PRK systems often include advanced pupil-tracking technology to ensure that the laser is precisely aligned with the patient’s eye throughout the procedure, even if the eye moves.

Cyclotorsion Control Advances:

  • Advanced systems can track the eye’s rotation during the procedure, ensuring precise treatment even if the eye rotates during surgery.

Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) Lenses:

  • These lenses create a smooth surface for light to focus correctly, improving your vision.

Advances in Excimer Laser Technology:

  • Excimer lasers have evolved to provide faster treatment times and better control of ablation patterns, leading to improved visual outcomes and reduced healing times.

The PRK Procedure

Surgery

  • PRK typically takes about 10 to 15 minutes per eye and is performed on an outpatient basis.
  • Anesthetic eye drops are used to numb the eye.
  • The surgeon removes the epithelium (top layer of the cornea) and reshapes the cornea using the excimer laser.

Recovery

  • After the procedure, you may experience some discomfort, such as a gritty sensation or mild irritation.
  • A protective contact lens is placed on your eye to aid in healing.
  • Vision improvement may take a few days to a week as the epithelium heals.

Benefits

Vision Improvement:

  • PRK can improve vision by correcting refractive errors, often reducing or eliminating the need for glasses or contact lenses.

Safe and Proven:

  • PRK has been safely performed for decades and is considered a proven and effective procedure.

Suitable for Active Lifestyles:

  • PRK is a laser eye surgery that reshapes the cornea‚Äôs surface, benefiting keratoconus patients by smoothing out corneal irregularities.

Long-Term Results:

  • PRK provides stable, long-term vision improvement

Risks and Complications

Possible risks include:

Temporary Discomfort:

  • You may experience mild irritation or discomfort as your epithelium heals.

Haze:

  • Some patients may experience corneal haze during the healing process.

Glare and Halos:

  • You may notice glare or halos around lights, particularly at night, during the recovery period.

Overcorrection or Undercorrection:

  • Although rare, there is a possibility that the laser may overcorrect or undercorrect your refractive error.

Postoperative Care

Protective Contact Lenses:

  • Your doctor may place a contact lens on your eye to protect the cornea as it heals.

Eye drops

  • Use prescribed eye drops to prevent infection, inflammation, and dryness.

Follow-Up Appointments:

  • Attend all scheduled follow-up appointments to monitor your healing progress and vision improvement.

Avoid Eye Rubbing:

  • Refrain from rubbing your eyes, as this can interfere with the healing process.

Patient Experiences and Testimonials

  • Patients who have undergone PRK often report significant improvement in vision and satisfaction with the results.
  • Refrain from rubbing your eyes, as this can interfere with the healing process.

FAQs

PRK stands for photorefractive keratectomy. It is a type of laser eye surgery that reshapes the cornea to correct refractive errors such as myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism.

PRK usually takes about 10 to 15 minutes per eye.

Yes, PRK is a safe and effective procedure that has been performed for many years. It is considered a proven method for vision correction.

Recovery time varies for each individual, but most patients begin to see improvement within a few days. Complete recovery may take a few weeks.

Some patients may experience mild discomfort or irritation during the recovery period, but it usually resolves within a few days.

Most patients can return to work and normal activities within a few days, depending on their healing progress. Avoid strenuous activities or swimming for a few weeks.

Most patients can return to work within a few days to a week after PRK, depending on their healing progress and the nature of their job. Your surgeon will provide personalized guidance on when it’s safe to return to work.

Customied PRK, also known as wavefront-guided PRK or Contoura, uses advanced mapping technology to create a personalized treatment plan based on your unique corneal topography and optical aberrations. This allows for precise and targeted laser ablation, potentially resulting in improved visual outcomes.

Trans PRK is a no-touch version of PRK where the epithelium and the underlying corneal tissue are ablated simultaneously using an excimer laser. This procedure can provide smoother and more comfortable healing.

Both PRK and LASIK are laser eye surgery procedures that reshape the cornea to correct refractive errors. The primary difference lies in how the procedures are performed. In LASIK, a corneal flap is created and then the underlying tissue is reshaped with the laser. In PRK, the top layer of the cornea (epithelium) is removed, and the laser reshapes the exposed cornea. PRK is better suited for individuals with thinner corneas or those with active lifestyles.

PRK reshapes the cornea by removing the epithelium and applying the laser directly to the corneal tissue. In SMILE (Small Incision Lenticule Extraction), a small incision is made in the cornea, and a tiny lenticule is removed to correct refractive errors. SMILE is a more recent procedure and may offer a faster recovery time, but PRK has a longer history of safety and effectiveness.

SILK (Sub-Bowman’s Keratomileusis) is a newer procedure that uses a femtosecond laser to create a sub-Bowman’s lenticule that is then extracted to correct refractive errors. PRK and SILK differ in the methods used to reshape the cornea, with PRK applying the laser directly to the cornea’s surface and SILK focusing on a deeper layer beneath Bowman’s membrane.

PRK eye surgery is the same as PRK laser eye surgery, where an excimer laser is used to reshape the cornea to correct refractive errors.

The cost of PRK eye surgery in India can vary depending on the clinic, the surgeon’s experience, and the specific technology used. It’s best to consult with your chosen clinic for an accurate cost estimate.

Recovery time for PRK eye surgery can vary, but most patients begin to see improvement within a few days. Complete recovery may take a few weeks.

PRK laser eye surgery is another term for photorefractive keratectomy, a laser surgery that reshapes the cornea to correct refractive errors.

The cost of PRK eye surgery can vary depending on the surgeon, clinic, and location. It’s important to discuss costs and any potential financing options with your chosen clinic.

PRK surgery price can vary depending on several factors, including the surgeon, the clinic, and the technology used. Make sure to discuss costs and possible financing options with your chosen clinic.

Why Choose Dr. Shanthi Niketh as Your Surgeon for PRK Surgery

Choosing the right surgeon for your PRK surgery is crucial for ensuring a successful procedure and smooth recovery. Here are a few reasons why Dr. Shanthi Niketh may be the best choice for your PRK surgery:

Expertise and Experience:

Dr. Shanthi Niketh is a highly skilled ophthalmologist with extensive experience in PRK surgery.

Personalized Care:

Dr. Shanthi Niketh takes the time to understand your vision needs and goals, tailoring your PRK treatment plan to your specific situation.

Patient Education:

Dr. Shanthi Niketh is committed to educating his patients about the procedure and what to expect before, during, and after surgery.

State-of-the-Art Equipment:

Dr. Shanthi Niketh uses the latest technology and techniques to perform PRK surgery safely and efficiently.

Thorough Postoperative Care:

Dr. Shanthi Niketh provides comprehensive postoperative care, including follow-up appointments to monitor your healing and address any concerns.

In summary, photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is a safe and effective laser eye surgery that can correct refractive errors and improve your vision. If you are considering PRK, consult with an experienced ophthalmologist like Dr. Shanthi Niketh to determine if it is the right option for you. PRK can provide long-term vision improvement and enhance your quality of life.

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